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St Issey & Little Petherick

Traditional

SERVICES

Sundays at  10am (see below)

Tuesdays at 10.30 St Issey (Holy Communion)


1st Sunday St Issey (Holy Communion)

2nd Sunday St Issey (Morning Worship)

3rd Sunday Little Petherick (Holy Communion)

4th Sunday Little Petherick (Morning Worship)

5th Sunday St Issey (All Ages)


Churches are open daily for private prayer



We are one parish that contains two villages and churches, with a shared Christian heritage.

Both churches offer a warm welcome!


Little Petherick is a growing community that is passionate about preserving the natural beauty, rich culture and history within the village. The church serves the community and is a place where all can come together.  Sunday services are traditional and we enjoy welcoming choirs such as the Bristol University Madrigal Ensemble.

St Issey is also a growing village with much going on. The church is at the centre of community life and we are keen to support and nurture our local families and children, as well as the local Church of England School.

We are a small but growing congregation and we look forward to you joining us!

 

History

St Issey Parish Church was originally built in the fourteenth century and was largely rebuilt in 1870-71. It has serviced the community of the village of St. Issey for generations and is the focal point for many local events.

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History

St Petroc Minor of Nansfounteyn, Little Petherick (Nansfounteyn meaning the fountain in the valley)

It is believed that the church stands on the original site where St Petroc had his preaching cell, the church dates from the 14th Century and has been rebuilt several times most recently in 1858 by the then Rector Sir Hugh Molesworth.  Sir Hugh was much influenced by the Tractarian, High Church Movement and it was rebuilt under the direction of a fashionable London architect, William White using as far as possible its old materials.  

In 1898 the patronage passed to Athelstan Riley, who employed J. Ninian Comper to restore the church to what it had been before the troubles of the 16th Century.  The incongruous 19th Century decorations were swept away, and it became a remarkable shrine to Anglo-Catholicism.

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